ocean science at Birmingham

Although far from the oceans, the University of Birmingham has many staff focussed on scientific ocean drilling and marine geology research. Birmingham academics have led ocean expeditions to uncover the structure of mid-ocean ridges and the edges of the continents. They have sailed to the edges of Antarctica and to the warmest tropical oceans in search of Earth’s climate history. And they use computer simulations to understand the oceans' past and predict the future. This exhibition tells the story of some of this research.

DR TOM DUNKLEY JONES

Micropalaeontologist

Tom studies the ocean’s phytoplankton - the single-celled algae that provide the food for marine ecosystems – and how these change through time. He has sailed on two IODP Expeditions to the tropical Pacific and will lead an Expedition to the tropical Atlantic in 2020.

  • White Twitter Icon
  • White Instagram Icon

DR kirsty edgar

Micropalaeontologist

Kirsty studies single-celled organisms called foraminifera (“forams”), and uses their chemistry to reconstruct the temperature of the ocean and the concentrations of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. She has sailed on IODP expeditions to the equatorial Pacific and Southern Ocean.

  • White Twitter Icon
  • White Instagram Icon

DR SARAH GREENE

Palaeoclimatologist

Sarah uses computer models to understand the behaviour of the whole ocean over time, especially how climate is controlled by changes in the carbon cycle. To do this, she needs lots of data from ocean drilling!

 

  • White Twitter Icon
  • White Instagram Icon

Marine Geologist

Gaël is a marine geologist, interested in the structure of the sea bed and ocean floor. He has sailed on seven marine survey expeditions, including one on the Japanese IODP Drill Ship Chikyu.

  • White Twitter Icon

DR steve jones

Geologist

Steve studies how plumes of hot material from the Earth’s mantle can move ocean floor, and how this might change deep ocean currents. He has sailed on many ship surveys of the NE Atlantic.

Organic Geochemist

Yvette traces changes in plant and bacterial life over millions of years, by studying the organic compounds they leave behind in sediments. From these chemicals, she can also tell you about past temperatures and atmospheric carbon dioxide levels.

  • White Twitter Icon

professor tim reston

Geophysicist

Tim studies the edges of plates – where continents become oceans, and the ridges where new oceans have formed. He has led ship survey expeditions to the mid-Atlantic ridge and the Iberian margin.

dr james

bendle

Organic Geochemist

James studies ancient climates by looking at the chemical traces left behind by life. He has sailed on IODP Expeditions to the Antarctic and Arabian Sea.

  • White Twitter Icon
  • White Instagram Icon

Micropalaeontologist

Ian uses the fossil remains of tiny crustaceans, called ostracods, to reconstruct past marine environments.

DR SEBASTIAN WATT

Volcanologist

Seb seeks to understand the natural hazards coming from active island volcanoes, including catastrophic landslides and tsunamis. Seb has sailed on ship surveys in SE Asia.

Marine Geophysicist

Murray studies the plumbing system of volcanoes, landslides and tsunamis, and how the oceans form. He has sailed on a ship to survey the Mid-Atlantic Ridge between Africa and South America.​

  • White Twitter Icon
IODP.png
ECORD-logo.png
NERC.jpg
alumni.png

MYSTERIES OF THE DEEP © 2019

With special thanks to Patricia Maruejol (ECORD), Sharon Cooper (USIO) and Nicole Kurtz (USIO) for advice and sharing of IODP outreach content for this exhibition.

uni.png